Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Weathersfield Weekly June 28

June 28, 2017
Weathersfield, Vt.

I don't know about you but I had one crazy busy week last week. 

On Wednesday, the Summer Solstice, I spent the afternoon in Reading and Hartland. I attended the "All About Orchids" program hosted by the Hall Art Foundation. It started at the museum/gallery on Rte 106 in Reading and moved to  the Eshqua Bog in Hartland. I covered the program for the Vermont Standard. I'll post my article soon.





More orchid photos: CLICK HERE


Thursday afternoon, I covered an oil spill on I91 north of the Hartland exit that closed one lane of the highway. A tanker carrying used cooking oil was hit and leaked oil everywhere. I covered this for the Vermont Standard.




More oil spill photos: CLICK HERE


After the accident I traveled to Lebanon to spend the afternoon and evening with Michael Franti. Franti was performing a SOLD-OUT show at Lebanon Opera House but in the afternoon he hosted a Yoga Class in Colburn Park taught by Heather from Mighty Yoga, NH.



More concert photos: CLICK HERE
Satsang opened the show, photos of them CLICK HERE

Friday night, I went to one of my favorite venues, Billsville House Concerts in Manchester, Vt. I saw Parsonsfield.




More photos: CLICK HERE




Carling and Will, a local duo, opened the show.





More photos of these two: CLICK HERE
On Saturday, I visited the 2nd Annual Strawberry Festival hosted by Wellwood Orchards. I like strawberries but the real reason I went was to see two of my favorite Burlington Vt. musicians: Lowell Thompson and Kelly Ravin-The Welterweights perform. It was so cool to have these guys basically in my backyard!



 More photos from the Strawberry Festival: CLICK HERE



Video Playlist: The Welterweights

Sunday, I interviewed Esther Allen, president of the Reading Historical Society for the Vermont Standard , RHS has a new home and will open its doors  at Old Home Days on July 2. I'll post that article soon too.




More photos of the Reading Historical Society's new building: CLICK HERE



Now on to the News You Can Use

Weathersfield select board news: The select board approved two large gathering permits at their meeting on June 19. One for the Crown Point Country Club for the July 4th celebration to be held on Saturday, July 1 with fireworks and a second for the 2nd annual Town Festival to be held on Saturday, September 30. Both permits were unanimously approved. The board approved spending $146,000 for the new West Weathersfield Fire Truck that was approved by voters in March 2016. The select board asked for a budget line clarification of the miscellaneous account and were told via email that of the $2065, $1386 was for a Christmas Party. The July 3 meeting was rescheduled for July 10 because of the holiday. More information about the select board and the town, contact Town Manager, Ed Morris, at 802-674-2626 or townmanager@weathersfield.org.

Weathersfield Proctor Library news: On Friday, June 23 the library launched its new and improved website. It is easy to find all the information about the library and you can always call Mark at 802-674-2863.


Get Out and About Events
Old Home Day in Reading Sunday, July 2. Hosted by the Reading Fire Department (their 42nd year!) Parade at 11 a.m. Chicken BBQ, and the 11th Annual Duck Derby. All welcome.

Old Home Day and Independence Day Parade in West Windsor Tuesday, July 4. Pancake breakfast at 7 a.m. at the Church, 8 a.m. Book Sale at the Library; Games and fun 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Albert Bridge School. Parade at 12:45 "Our American Heroes." For more information call Sherry at 802-484-9286.

A Summer Evening with Friends and Neighbors in Weathersfield Saturday, July 15 6:30 p.m. at Weathersfield Center Meeting House. A benefit for the library. Proctor Players will perform a couple of Shakespeare scenes. Library Director Mark will give a pre-view of the fall library program about the art colony in Greenbush. Tony Mastaler’s jazz group will entertain. $15 suggested donation with proceeds being matched by the Byrne Foundation for the WPL Capital Campaign. More information call the Library 802-674-2863.

Wine Tasting at the Inn at Weathersfield in Perkinsville Thursday July 20 5:30-7 p.m. Taste Red Tail Ridge Wines from the Finger Lakes and nibble on "toasts." Meet Red Tail Ridge founder/owner Nancy Irelan. $15 pp.. Three course cider-paired table-talk dinner with Nancy. Limited to 15 pp. $50 pp Call for reservations 802-263-9217.

Frippery in Weathersfield Aug. 5. The historical society is hosting their annual Frippery in August and is looking for donations. They are also selling raffle tickets for a lovely quilt. Contact Maureen Bogosian at 603-252-0936 for more information



Music and Performances

Freight House in White River Junction. June 30 7:30 p.m. Music on the Deck with Idreeze, July 6, 13, 20, 27 9 p.m. Club Steam, July 28 8 p.m. The Brooks Hubbard Band.

Inn at Weathersfield Live Music Fridays in Perkinsville 7-9 p.m.: June 30 Dave Clark; July 7 Ali T; July 14 Steve Ellis; July 21 Erik Boedtker; July 28 Dave Clark.

Lebanon Opera House in Lebanon NH. NCCT: Beauty and the Beast July 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, at 7:30 p.m. July 8, 9 at 2 p.m.. Tickets on sale now at the LOH Box office.

Taverne on the Square in Claremont. June 30 9 p.m. SIRSY, July 1 8 p.m. Tirade, July 6 7 p.m. Charlie Christo, July 7 7 p.m. Kim Logan and the Wild Root, July 13 7 p.m. Brian Warren, July 14 7 p.m. Jason Cann, July 14 Evelyn Cormie

Windsor Station Live Music in Windsor June 30 9:30 p.m. Rumblecat, July 1 10 p.m. Cultural Chemistry,Maiden Voyage and Caesar Comanche, July 6 7:30 p.m. Stuart Ross and The Temp Agency, July 7 9:30 p.m. Soulfix, July 8 9:30 p.m. Moxley Union.



Ongoing Events

Weathersfield Hikes: To the Cabin Sunday, August 12 11:30 a.m.; Ferry Road and the Connecticut River Saturday, September 2 5 p.m.; Cooks Pond Loop Saturday, September 23, 9:30 a.m.; Ascutney Mountain Saturday, October 7 9 a.m.

Weathersfield Food Shelf in Perkinsville every Thursday from 2-3 p.m. Route 106 at the old Perkinsville Elementary School.

Low cost spay/neuter clinics in Springfield. Springfield Humane Society is hosting low cost spay/neuter clinics: July 11, Aug. 8, Sept. 5, Oct. 24, Dec. 5 at the Springfield Humane Society, on Route 143. Cost is $50 for female cat and $40 for male cat. Weathersfield residents may be reimbursed up to $50 for the surgery with a limit of three pets per year. Get your SNAP form from the town office. Please call Springfield Humane Society for an appointment at 802-885-3997.

Valley Court Diversion Programs: Volunteers are needed in Weathersfield/Springfield areas to work with low level offenders in the community. The group meets once a month at the Springfield Police Department, your commitment will require about three hours a month. Training is provided. For more information please visit our website at vcdp.org or call Maureen at 281-5213.

Senior Exercise Program in Ascutney: Free. Sponsored by RSPV. Mondays and Wednesdays 10-11 a.m. in basement of Martin Memorial Hall, Route 5, Ascutney. Classes are led by Sandy Lemois. If interested call 674-5254 for more information.

Need to Find a Business in Weathersfield: weathersfielddirectory.org.



Have anything you want included in this news and events column? Email Nancy at photosbynanci@comcast.net two weeks prior to your event.

Visit Photos By Nanci using a Q reader app!

Reading Historical Society Gets a New Home-The old Reading Christian Union building

June 25, 2017
Reading, Vt.

The green door is open and the smell of fresh varnish is wafting through it. The foyer is bright and welcoming. The Reading Christian Union building is freshly painted and the wood floors have been restored. The Reading Historical Society (RHS) is moving in.

The RHS outgrew their old home, as many families do, when they expand, in this case their collections (not children.) The old building (next to the library) was removed in May and is now a parking lot. "We want people to know it's (RHS) here. I can guarantee you this, that there is (only) a small group of people who have actually been through the Historical Society" said RHS president Esther Allen, "I'm hoping this (new building) is really going to open it up for people to feel good about it (the Reading Historical Society)."

"Two years ago at town meeting there was an article, a warning to see if the Church group, wanted to donate it to the town and the town's people accepted it at that town meeting. When the Church presented it to the Town if was with the understanding that it would be a 99 year lease." The agreement was made with the understanding that the Town and RHS would maintain the building during this lease period. Also part of the agreement was that the front of the Church would remain, with pulpit and a couple of pews. The piano and organ are also there, in what has become a music corner, for folks to explore some of the old musical instruments in the RHS collection.

The floors were refurbished in just three days. The work was done by New Life Wood Floors out of Cavendish. The old carpeting was removed and volunteers painstakingly pulled carpet nails for days in preparation for the renovation. The nail holes remain so you can appreciated the time these volunteers took making ready for the flooring contractors.

Once the floors were done, volunteers began moving items from the old building. RHS had display cases in the old building, these were first cleaned and then moved. A couple were painted to brighten them up. As collections were moved, they too were cleaned. Many of the items that were tagged with numbers and descriptions, these were checked against the master list of the collection (an excel spreadsheet maintained by Allen.) "These tags will need to be updated" Allen said, "they are pretty old."

"Our plan is to put things out piecemeal, so that we can change out exhibits, rather than having everything out. And as we go along, I see this is a work in progress. I've finally convinced myself that I don't have to everything done all at once. And it's really with the idea of getting people involved with it, to help with the exhibits. To get other people thinking, Milde Waterfall, who is one of our members, worked at the Smithsonian, she will have a lot of good ideas of how to set up the exhibits, ideas on themes and things like that."

Allen and the Board of Directors for RHS have a long list of things that need to be done and are hoping area residents will become interested in these projects. The list includes: copying old documents; digitizing their photographs; creating a searchable website; expand their genealogy records, which are recorded currently in an old notebook; creating photographs from their old glass negatives. "This list is endless" said Allen.

Gone are most of the old pews (with the help of Eleanor and Sam Grice, Nate and Linda Willard, Greg Smith, Jim Bartlett, and Bob and Esther Allen.) The new museum space is open and bright and inviting. The "grand opening" is timed for Old Home Days on July 2. "We're just going to be open for a few hours, it's one of those cases where everybody on the committee is on another committee so...I'm on the Auxiliary but I'm going to take a few minutes to come down just to see the (gasp), you know that feeling, when they walk though the door. And the green door will be open.



Visit Photos By Nanci using a Q reader app!

It's All About The Orchids-Hall Art Foundation hosts Orchid Talk and Tour

June 21, 2017
Reading and Hartland, Vt.

The first day of summer was Wednesday, June 21. It started cloudy and cool but by the afternoon it was sunny and warm, just the way orchids like it. To help celebrate the summer solstice, the Hall Art Foundation, in Reading, hosted a program entitled "All About Orchids." This event like most things that happen at the Hall Art Foundation was free and open to the public (but an appointment is needed to take a tour.)

Today's tour was conducted by Bridgewater Corners resident and Director of Operations at Hall Art Foundation, Linda Fondulas. In 2007, Andrew and Christine Hall founded the Hall Art Foundation with the purpose of sharing some of their postwar and contemporary artworks with the public. They also operate a museum in a castle in Derneburg, Germany; are in an exhibition partnership with the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA) in North Adams, Ma.; and operate this gallery/museum in Reading, Vermont.

In 2012, the Hall Art Foundation opened its doors to the public after years of renovating the Lexington Farm located in the center of Reading. The original farm was built by Elisha Watkins in the early 1800's and was an active dairy until the 1980's. The farmhouse and outbuildings themselves are fascinating to view but the interiors are what one might call spectacular. In three years the old farm was converted into 6000 square feet of museum-quality galleries and exhibition space.

The property in Reading currently has an exhibit of Outdoor Sculpture which includes: Richard Deacon's "Untitled" a welded steel piece of vertical loops; Olafur Eliasson's Waterfall (just feet from the natural waterfall of the Black River in the center of town) and Marc Quinn's "The Incredible World of Desire" a 20 foot tall orchid. Fondulas explained each piece carefully and answered questions about them but what most people came for was the orchids.

Fondulas turned the tour over to Kim DeLong, the Greenhouse Curator and Manager at Dartmouth College, who oversees the Brout Orchid Collection. This orchid collection was a gift from Alan Brout, Class of 1951 and contains close to 1000 individual plants from the family Orchidaceae.

"Why do most people kill orchids, they overwater them" she said. "They also water them with tap water which contains too much salt. It's best to water with purified water, rainwater of distilled water." DeLong showed off some of the orchids housed in the Dartmouth greenhouse and explained what made each type unique, what substrate to grow each type in and how often to water and feed them. After all the questions were asked, the twenty or so orchid enthusiasts got into their cars and drove to Eshqua Bog in Hartland.


The Hall Art Foundation arranged a guided tour of the Bog, which is actually a fen, with local volunteer stewards Susan and Dean Greenberg. Susan Greenberg explained that Grace Ann Ridlon, an English teacher in Woodstock, worked with the Nature Conservancy to preserve the eight acres of wetland when the property was put up for sale. The Nature Conservancy and the New England Wildflower Society also purchased the surrounding 33 acres in 1990.


"We were here last weekend and only four showy lady slippers (Cypripedium reginae) were open, we're in luck today, they are in full bloom" Susan Greenberg declared. "We are also in luck because the Green Bog (Platanthera hyperborea) and White Bog (Platanthera dilatata) orchids are open" Dean Greenberg told the tour group. If you venture to the Eshqua Bog bring a wildflower guidebook, there are so many interesting plants to view in this wetland, although the lady slippers are the star attractions. "Their species name is reginae, queen, they really are the queens" said Susan.

After the wildflower walk along the 400 foot boardwalk, some people followed DeLong up to Dartmouth College to tour the Brout Orchid Collection. Others went home after spending the first day of summer with the Eshqua Bog lady slippers.



Visit Photos By Nanci using a Q reader app!

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Weathersfield Weekly June 21

June 21, 2017 (First Day of Summer!)
Weathersfield, Vt


What a fun weekend I had, how about you? I know it rained Friday but I got the housework done and was free to play all weekend. I hit the Quechee Balloon Festival on Saturday and got to see Say Darling perform on Saturday afternoon. I've followed Celia Woodsmith, a Norwich native and Say Darling's lead singer, for years and she just keeps getting better. I also got to see The James Montgomery Band entertaining the crowd during the balloon launch Saturday night. And I crossed something off my Bucket List-a hot air balloon ride. Yup, I took to the sky on Sunday morning thanks to Better Homes and Gardens-The Masiello Group in Quechee. I won their Deck Party Balloon Ride Give-Away. It was awesome. Flying over the tree tops, touching the misty fog over the Quechee hills, and getting a bird's eye view of the Upper Valley, just beautiful. I highly recommend it.


Wednesday night, I saw Windsor County State Senator, Dick McCormack perform for the Hartford Historical Society. It was a Vermont history lesson through songs.

A few more photos from the evening: CLICK HERE

I covered two graduation ceremonies this week:

Prosper Valley School in Pomfret on Tuesday evening.


More photos from the ceremony: CLICK HERE


and Albert Bridge School in West Windsor on Friday morning.





More photos from ABS Class of 2017: CLICK HERE


Some of the things I saw at the 38th Annual Quechee Balloon Festival this past weekend.




More photos from this demonstration: CLICK HERE


Say Darling (formerly Woodsmith and Hersch)





More Say Darling photos: CLICK HERE




More James Montgomery Band photos: CLICK HERE




More Saturday Festival photos: CLICK HERE







More views from a Hot Air Balloon: CLICK HERE


Now, News You can Use...



Weathersfield select board news: The select board met June 19. Meeting highlights will be reported here next week. More information about the select board and the town, contact Town Manager, Ed Morris, at 802-674-2626 or townmanager@weathersfield.org.
Weathersfield School news: In case you missed the most recent Act 46 meeting you can watch at: https://vimeo.com/221949280. School is out for the summer so watch for children playing. For more information about the school and events, call 802-674-5400.



Get Out and About Events

Friends of the 1879 Schoolhouse Work Day in Perkinsville Saturday, June 24 8 a.m.-3 p.m.. Work includes small finishing touches on the ell, window frame restoration, transom windows, and north classroom. Call Matt 802-263-5300 for more information.

Strawberry Festival in Perkinsville Saturday, June 24 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Wellwood Orchards is hosting their 2nd Annual Strawberry Festival. Pick Your Own (PYO) strawberries, a petting zoo, wagon rides, crafts and music. Also available their famous cider donuts. Free and open to the public. 802-263-5200 for more information.

Dirty Road-A Coaster in Brownsville Sunday, June 25 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Register online at https://www.bikereg.com/droc.

Old Home Day and Independence Day Parade in West Windsor Tuesday, July 4. Pancake breakfast at 7 a.m. at the Church, 8 a.m. Book Sale at the Library; Games and fun 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Albert Bridge School. Parade at 12:45 "Our American Heroes." For more information call Sherry at 802-484-9286.

A Summer Evening with Friends and Neighbors in Weathersfield Saturday, July 15 6:30 p.m. at Weathersfield Center Meeting House. A benefit for the library. Proctor Players will perform a couple of Shakespeare scenes. Library Director Mark will give a pre-view of the fall library program about the art colony in Greenbush. Tony Mastaler’s jazz group will entertain. $15 suggested donation with proceeds being matched by the Byrne Foundation for the WPL Capital Campaign. More information call the Library 802-674-2863.

Frippery in Weathersfield Aug. 5. The historical society is hosting their annual Frippery in August and is looking for donations. They are also selling raffle tickets for a lovely quilt. Contact Maureen Bogosian at 603-252-0936 for more information





Music and Performances

Freight House in White River Junction. June 24 Fairies and Rainbows: LGBTQ+ Masquerade Ball 9 p.m.-1 a.m.

Inn at Weathersfield Live Music Fridays in Perkinsville 7-9 p.m.: June 23 Ali T., June 30 Dave Clark.

Lebanon Opera House in Lebanon NH. Beauty and the Beast July 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, at 7:30 p.m. July 8, 9 at 2 p.m.. Tickets on sale now at the LOH Box office.

Taverne on the Square in Claremont NH. June 22 7 p.m. Kid Pinky, June 23 7 p.m. Jack Lawless, June 24 8 p.m. Squids, June 29 6 p.m. Brad Myrick, June 30 9 p.m. SIRSY.

Windsor Station Live Music in Windsor, June 22 7:30 p.m. Glass Half Full, June 23 9:30 p.m. Swimmer, June 30 9:30 p.m. Rumblecat.

Ongoing Events

Weathersfield Hikes: Tucker Trail Lookout Saturday, June 24, 9:30 a.m.; Little Ascutney Saturday, July 1 9:30 a.m.; To the Cabin Sunday, August 12 11:30 a.m.; Ferry Road and the Connecticut River Saturday, September 2 5 p.m.; Cooks Pond Loop Saturday, September 23, 9:30 a.m.; Ascutney Mountain Saturday, October 7 9 a.m.

Weathersfield Food Shelf in Perkinsville every Thursday from 2-3 p.m. Route 106 at the old Perkinsville Elementary School.

Low cost spay/neuter clinics
in Springfield. Springfield Humane Society is hosting low cost spay/neuter clinics: July 11, Aug. 8, Sept. 5, Oct. 24, Dec. 5 at the Springfield Humane Society, on Route 143. Cost is $50 for female cat and $40 for male cat. Weathersfield residents may be reimbursed up to $50 for the surgery with a limit of three pets per year. Get your SNAP form from the town office. Please call Springfield Humane Society for an appointment at 802-885-3997.

Valley Court Diversion Programs
: Volunteers are needed in Weathersfield/Springfield areas to work with low level offenders in the community. The group meets once a month at the Springfield Police Department, your commitment will require about three hours a month. Training is provided. For more information please visit our website at vcdp.org or call Maureen at 281-5213.

Senior Exercise Program
in Ascutney: Free. Sponsored by RSPV. Mondays and Wednesdays 10-11 a.m. in basement of Martin Memorial Hall, Route 5, Ascutney. Classes are led by Sandy Lemois. If interested call 674-5254 for more information.

Need to Find a Business in Weathersfield: weathersfielddirectory.org.

Have anything you want included in this news and events column? Email Nancy at photosbynanci@comcast.net two weeks prior to your event.

Visit Photos By Nanci using a Q reader app!